Oscars 2015

Homogenous Hollywood & Sustaining the Status Quo

Each year, Hollywood celebrates what it considers to be the best in motion picture entertainment. The event, better known as the “Oscars”, presents awards to everyone they perceive as the best that year by category including best leading actress, best leading actor, best supporting actress, best supporting actor, best director, best musical composer, best screenwriter(s), etc. Nominees are decided based on a vote of The Academy, a collective body of persons deemed to possess expert knowledge in the respective fields of expertise within the business of motion picture development. Final award recipients are also determined by a vote of The Academy. Hence, it is widely perceived that a nod, or nomination, by The Academy, gives an individual or artistic endeavor even greater credibility.

It should go without saying that the Oscars are a monumental, cultural event. Television and print media outlets, morning shows, and web-based entertainment sites, to name a few, invest heavily in the coverage of the Oscars. All aspects of the Oscars are covered and speculated upon including the attendees’ fashion choices, after parties, menu, and of course, the nominees and eventual winners. Because of the attention that Oscar nominees receive, it is often a career validating or catapulting moment for those in the movie making business.

Oscar Nominees 2015 ImageThis year, as in previous years, there has been an enormous amount of discussion about the lack of diversity among this year’s nominees. (In fact, this year’s ceremony has earned the hashtag #OscarsSoWhite.) Not one person of color was nominated for the categories of best lead actress, best lead actor, best supporting actress, and best supporting actor. This was especially an issue for many, as the movie Selma that, chronicled the civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, did not receive the nominations many believed it deserved. A range of hypotheses have been offered in response to the lack of diverse nominations. Some have contended there simply was not an adequate number of persons of color in leading roles this past year while others have contended that the demographic composition of the Academy obscures the unbiased perception and subsequent equitable selection of nominees. (more…)

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